Fall 2017 Courses, CPC Sections of TWU Courses, Glover Road Campus

 

 

Dr. Brook Herbert, Mondays & Wednesdays, 2:35 pm to 3:50 pm

ART 215 CP, Beauty and the Sacred Arts: Introduction to the Sacred Arts (3 sem. hrs.)

This course introduces students to the particular genre of “Sacred Art” and the subject of “beauty” as central to the proclamation of the Gospel with which the Church has been entrusted. As such, Beauty and Sacred Art will be discussed as properly the subject matter of Theology. The course engages a broad historical study of the Sacred Arts, beginning with Byzantine Art and Spirituality up until the present, and addresses aspects of painting, the written word, music and architecture. A primary focus is the genre of Sacred Art as it impacts the Christian individual, the Church and the world as a whole.

  • Prerequisite(s): none

  • This course meets University Core Requirements for Arts, Media & Culture, and meets the requirements for an Art & Design Major, Art Concentration, or Minor.

   All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

Image: Jesus laying on the lap of his mother Mary, after the crucifixion. The "Pieta" is the only work ever signed by Michelangelo.

Video: The Vatican Museums 3D, 2015, Sky Italia

Dr. Adrienne Castellon, Fridays, 2:35 pm to 5:15 pm

EDUC 203 CP, Foundations of Education (3 sem. hrs.)

A critical consideration of selected educational thinkers and the establishment and development of public schooling in British Columbia. An evaluation of prominent theoretical approaches to education and how they are rooted in certain worldview perspectives. An analysis of concepts such as teaching, training, indoctrination, tolerance, pluralism, multiculturalism, and relevance. An examination of important issues in education such as the nature and aims of schooling, views of knowledge and the curriculum, and moral and values education. The development of a personal theory of education.

   • Prerequisite(s) or Co-requisites: EDUC 211; second year standing. (3-0; 0-0)

   • The course meets the requirements for an Education Major, Concentration, or Minor.

    All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

    CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

School of the Future, 2016, PBS Nova

 

Vic Cavalli, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9:25 am to 10:40 am

ENGL 103 CP, Introduction to Fiction (3 sem. hrs.) 

An introductory study of fiction with the purpose of understanding literature and cultivating skills in scholarly research, textual analysis, and academic writing and documentation. Such skills are fostered by closely reading and analyzing works of short fiction and the novel written by accomplished prose stylists. Students focus on the distinctive conventions of fiction in order to interpret these works critically, while interacting thoughtfully with themes presented therein. There is a particular focus on analyzing and making use of narrative strategies and rhetorical tools. Students continue to develop their academic prose, with attention to improving foundational grammar, diction, phrasing, organization, and argument-building in the thesis-driven essay.

  • Prerequisite(s): WRTG 100 or 101 unless exempt at point of admission to the University. (3-0; 3-0)

  • This course fulfills University Core Requirements for English, and the requirements for an English Major, Concentration, or Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Video: The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2001, New Line Cinema

Loranne Brown, Tuesdays, 6 pm to 9 pm

MCOM 172 CP, Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3 sem. hrs)

An introduction to basic self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills. Students learn about the nature of the communication process. The emphasis is on developing and practising the ability to communicate effectively with others. As part of the course requirements, students are expected to share personal (but not necessarily private) experiences with others. 

  • Fulfills university core requirement for Society and Culture, and the Media + Communication Department human competency requirement.

   Prerequisite(s): none

   The course meets the University Core Requirement for Society & Culture; and meets the requirements for a Communications Major, Concentration, or Minor; or Psychology, and Sociology Ancillary Requirements.

   All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Video: "Who's on First", Abbott and Costello, One Night in the Tropics, 1940, Universal Pictures

Fr. David Bellusci, O.P., Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1:10 pm to 2:25 pm

PHIL 111 CP, History of Western Philosophy: Ancient & Medieval Period (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is a survey of the teachings of the great philosophers of the West, from the discovery of physics by the Pre-Socratics, to the culmination of medieval Scholasticism (i.e., in John of St. Thomas), with a special emphasis upon developments in the philosophy of religion.

  • Prerequisite(s): None.

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

 

Image:  Plato and Aristotle are the central figures in Raphael's "The School of Athens".

Image Credit:  Raphael [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Video: Plato's Allegory of the Cave, Narrated by Orson Welles, 1973, Churchill Films

David Baird, Ph.D. cand., Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2:35 pm to 3:50 pm

PHIL 305 CP, Philosophy of the Human Person (3 sem. hrs.)

This course addresses what it means to say that human beings are persons having freedom and subjectivity. It examines the different powers of the human person, including the powers of understanding, willing, feeling, and loving. It will also examine the difference between body and soul, as well as the unity of the two in humans. Finally, it will explore the question of the immortality of the soul.

Instructor's Note: As a doctor often studies health by way of its opposite, so in this course positive accounts of the human person will be examined in close conjunction with negatives. The aim will be to reach a nuanced appreciation of human persons not only as individuals but as parts of functioning and flourishing societies, and will include critical engagement with several modern assumptions and attitudes by way of various postmodern critiques. As the focus is on human subjectivity, this will be done with frequent recourse to psychology, theology and the arts, specifically contemporary depictions of personal and interpersonal breakdown in postapocalyptic and zombie fictions.

  • Prerequisites: any 100-level PHIL course, or instructor’s permission.

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Video: Night of the Living Dead, 1968, SGL Entertainment. Warning: Mature content with extra cheese.

"Romero’s grainy black-and-white cinematography and casting of locals emphasize the terror lurking in ordinary life; as in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds (1963), Romero’s victims are not attacked because they did anything wrong, and the randomness makes the attacks all the more horrifying. Nothing holds the key to salvation, either, whether it’s family, love, or law. Topping off the existential dread is Romero’s then-extreme use of gore, as zombies nibble on limbs and viscera. Initially distributed by a Manhattan theater chain owner, Night, made for about 100,000 dollars, was dismissed as exploitation, but after a 1969 re-release, it began to attract favorable attention for scarily tapping into Vietnam-era uncertainty and nihilistic anxiety. By 1979, it had grossed over 12 million, inspired a cycle of apocalyptic splatter films like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974), and set the standard for finding horror in the mundane. However cheesy the film may look, few horror movies reach a conclusion as desolately unsettling." Night of the Living Dead, 1968, SGL Entertainment

Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P., Mondays & Wednesdays, 1:10 pm to 2:25 pm

RELS 102 CP, Introduction to New Testament Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is an introduction to the major writings of the New Testament (Synoptic Gospels, Pauline, and Johannine Writings), including an orientation to the field of New Testament studies in the same areas as listed under RELS 101.

  • Prerequisite(s): none

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies, and meets the requirements for the following:
      º Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Religious Studies Major
      º Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

Image:  St. Paul the Evangelist depicted in stone and gripping the instrument of his martyrdom.

Video: Jerusalem, 2013, National Geographic Entertainment

Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P., Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:40 am to 1 pm

RELS 101 CP, Introduction to Old Testament Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is an introduction to the major division of the Old Testament (Pentateuch, Prophets, and Writings), including an orientation to the following areas in the field of Old Testament studies: Inspiration, principles of interpretation, canon, text, world of the Old Testament, historical backgrounds, archaeology, theology, criticism, literary forms, and deuterocanonical writings.

  • Prerequisite(s): None

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies, and meets the requirements for the following:
      ° Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Intercultural Religious Studies Minor
      ° Religious Studies Major
      ° Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image:  A pilgrim's view on the way up Mt. Sinai — in the footsteps of Moses.

Video: Jerusalem, 2013, National Geographic Entertainment

Dr. Andrew Kaethler, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:40 am to 1 pm

RELS 160 CP, Introduction to Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

An introduction to the field of Systematic Theology. Discusses issues of theological method and the historical development of some major Christian doctrines, and relates them to theological issues today. The CPC section of this course focuses on the articles of faith contained in the Apostle's Creed, and includes a survey of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

  • Prerequisite(s): None

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - Bible Content (0-5), and meets the requirements for the following:
      º Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Religious Studies Major
      º Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

Image:  The Incredulity of Thomas, by Caravaggio.

Image credit: Caravaggio [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

The Seventh Seal, 1957, Criterion

 

David Baird, Ph.D. cand., Tuesdays & Thursdays,  4 pm to 5:15 pm

RELS 224 CP, New Testament Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is a study of the New Testament writings, in their historical settings and chronological sequence, with the goal of acquiring knowledge of their theological unity and diversity. The CPC section of this course focuses on the person and mission of Jesus Christ as articulated in the New Testament documents and subsequently reflected upon in the early credal formulae and in the declarations of the Christian Church Councils of the fourth, fifth, and sixth centuries AD. Students will be exposed to the positions of contemporary scholars on various New Testament-related Christological questions.

  • Prerequisite(s): RELS 102 or instructor's consent

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - Bible Content (0-5), and meets the requirements for the following:
      ° Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC Courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

  

Image:  Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Video: Jesus of Nazareth, 1977, ITC Entertainment/RAI, Directed by Franco Zeffirelli

Dr. Brook Herbert, Mondays & Wednesdays, 4 pm to 5:15 pm

RELS 366 CP, Theology of the Body (3 sem. hrs.)

This course reviews the roots and evolution of the modern secular approaches to anthropology and human sexuality and contrasts them with those of Christ. Examine recent developments in theological reflection on the body (John Paul II’s theology of the body) and provides a general introduction to Christian anthropology, with particular attention to themes such as creation in the imago Dei, fall and redemption, nature and grace, freedom and rationality, gender and vocation. Convergent and divergent doctrinal positions held by various Christian traditions of the themes are reviewed.

   • Prerequisites: RELS 160. (0-0; 3-0)

   • This course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - C&C/ICRS (6-9), and meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree. CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

VIDEO: FightTheNewDrug.org

Dr. Andrew Kaethler, Mondays & Wednesdays, 9:25 am to 10:40 am

RELS 375 CP, The Christian Apologetics of C.S. Lewis (3 Sem. Hrs.)

This course provides a detailed study of the theological and apologetic writings of C.S.Lewis. The instructor presents the Christian worldview of Lewis, as well as limitations and problems that may be inherent in his theological vision. The relevance of Lewis' writings to the task of ecumenical theological dialogue is a recurrent theme.

C. S. Lewis was one of the twentieth century’s incisive intellects and an influential contributor to Christian apologetics and literature. He penned numerous books, ranging from nonfiction works of theology, philosophy, literary criticism and apologetics, to children’s literature, fiction and poetry. Since he was such a broad and intuitive thinker, it should be no surprise that some of the 20th century’s greatest philosophers and theologians have nothing but praise for him (e.g., Hans Urs Von Balthasar, Pope John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI, Josef Pieper, and Robert Spaemann). Although Lewis is recognised as a brilliant thinker, for him, reason did not have the last word. While “reason is the natural order of truth,” the “imagination is the organ of meaning.” With this in mind, we will explore Lewis’ perspective on life, love, language, literature, friendship, epistemology, myth, morality, and God via his works of imagination.

Instructor's Note: Like many people, I was introduced to the Narniad as a child and was enamoured by Lewis’ fictional world. In university, I discovered Lewis’ other works of fiction and nonfiction, and his logic and poetics significantly shaped my intellectual and spiritual development. During my time in Eastern Europe I was fortunate to be plunged head first into the Lewis corpus as I researched and prepared to teach two different university courses on Lewis. To top it off, while living in the UK, I supped at The Eagle and Child (affectionately known by Lewis et al as The Bird and the Babe), spent several evenings bantering and discussing literature, theology, and CS Lewis with Michael Ward (author of Planet Narnia), and attended mass in Oxford with Lewis’ private secretary, Walter Hooper. Even though my attention over the last few years has been turned towards the theological anthropology of Joseph Ratzinger and Alexander Schmemann, I remain a Lewis aficionado.

   • Prerequisites: RELS 160 or equivalent with instructor’s consent. (0-0; 3-0)

   • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - C&C/ICRS (6-9), and meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   • CPC Courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image: Aslan, the great Lion of C.S. Lewis' The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

Video: The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, & the Wardrobe, 2005, Walt Disney Pictures

Dr. David Klassen, Wednesdays, 6 pm to 9 pm

RELS 473 CP, The Theology of Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II (3 sem. hrs.)

This course takes an in-depth look at the theological vision of two very influential Catholic theologians of the second Christian millennium: St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope John Paul II. The main features of St. Thomas’s synthesis of Christian thought, especially as found in his great Summa Theologiae, is explored. This is followed by an examination of the “personalist” Thomism of Pope John Paul II, and his program for the renewal of the Catholic Faith, especially as found in selected encyclicals and apostolic letters. The vision and world view of St. Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II are presented as significant and enduring achievements of Christian thought.

St. John Paul II developed a characteristic Personalist Thomism which integrates specific insights from contemporary philosophy (Phenomenology). He also developed theological views through which, drawing inspiration from Aquinas’ insights and the whole Tradition of the Church, he wanted to show the truth and beauty of the faith to men and women of our times. Explore some of John Paul's theological motifs, both theoretical and practical. Among the theoretical, you will discover John Paul’s views concerning Christian humanism and of the Church as communion; among the practical, you will study topics such as the evangelization of culture, technology, and the role of the youth in the world and in the Church. Not without reason, John Paul carried on a number of initiatives in connection with these issues, such as that of World Youth Day.

    Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or equivalent with permission of instructor. (3-0; 0-0)

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

    All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

    CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.