Spring 2017 Courses - Glover Road Campus

Dr. Brook Herbert, Mondays & Wednesdays, 4 pm to 5:15 pm

ART 215 CP, Beauty and the Sacred Arts: Introduction to the Sacred Arts (3 sem. hrs.)

This course introduces students to the particular genre of “Sacred Art” and the subject of “beauty” as central to the proclamation of the Gospel with which the Church has been entrusted. As such, Beauty and Sacred Art will be discussed as properly the subject matter of Theology. The course engages a broad historical study of the Sacred Arts, beginning with Byzantine Art and Spirituality up until the present, and addresses aspects of painting, the written word, music and architecture. A primary focus is the genre of Sacred Art as it impacts the Christian individual, the Church and the world as a whole.

  • Prerequisite(s): none

  • This course meets University Core Requirements for Arts, Media & Culture, and meets the requirements for an Art & Design Major, Art Concentration, or Minor.

   All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

Image: Jesus laying on the lap of his mother Mary, after the crucifixion. The "Pieta" is the only work ever signed by Michelangelo.

Vic Cavalli, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9:25 am to 10:40 am

ENGL 104 CP, Introduction to Poetry and Drama (3 sem. hrs.) 

Building on the skills acquired in English 103, an advanced study of poetry and drama with the purpose of understanding literature and cultivating skills in scholarly research, textual analysis, and academic writing and documentation. Such skills are fostered by closely reading and analyzing poems and plays by accomplished writers. Students focus on the distinctive conventions of the genres of poetry and drama in order to interpret these works critically, while interacting thoughtfully with themes presented therein; there is a particular focus on analyzing and making use of effective patterns of language, lyrical and theatrical presentation, and figures of speech. Students continue to develop their academic prose, with attention to advanced grammar, diction, phrasing, organization and argument-building in the thesis-driven essay.

  • Prerequisite(s): WRTG 100 or 101 unless exempt at point of admission to the University. (3-0; 3-0)

  • This course fulfills University Core Requirements for English, and the requirements for an English Major, Concentration, or Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree. CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Dr. Germain McKenzie, Tuesdays, 6 pm to 9 pm

HIST 302 CP, Greece and Rome: Leadership in the Ancient World (3 sem. hrs.)

A study of the most influential leadership in ancient Greece and Rome. Plutarch’s biographical studies are the main focus. Various accounts of Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristotle, Xenophon, Livy, Sallust, Tacitus, and Suetonius are used as supplementary material.

   • Prerequisite(s): 6 sem. hrs. of History including HIST 107 or HIST 111, or instructor’s consent. (3-0 or 3-0)

   • This course meets University Core Requirements for History, and meets the requirements for the following: History Major, Concentration, or Minor (seek permission from the History Chair); Humanities and Social Sciences Majors; Communications, Psychology, and Sociology Ancillary Requirements;  and Social Studies Concentration

    All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

    CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

Image: The Maison Carrée, Nîmes, southern France; the best preserved Roman temple façade to be found anywhere in the territory of the former Roman Empire.

Loranne Brown, Thursdays, 6 pm to 9 pm

MCOM 172 CP, Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3 sem. hrs)

Introduces basic self-awareness and interpersonal communication skills. Students learn about the nature of the communications process. The emphasis is on developing and practicing the ability to communicate effectively with others. 

  • Fulfills university core requirement for Society and Culture, and the Communications Department human competency requirement.

   Prerequisite(s): none

   The course meets the University Core Requirement for Society & Culture; and meets the requirements for a Communications Major, Concentration, or Minor; or Psychology, and Sociology Ancillary Requirements.

   All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Dr. Andrew P. Klager, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2:35 pm to 3:50 pm

PHIL 111 CP, History of Western Philosophy: Ancient & Medieval Period (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is a survey of the teachings of the great philosophers of the West, from the discovery of physics by the Pre-Socratics, to the culmination of medieval Scholasticism (i.e., in John of St. Thomas), with a special emphasis upon developments in the philosophy of religion.

  • Prerequisite(s): None.

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

 

Image:  Plato and Aristotle are the central figures in Raphael's "The School of Athens".

Image Credit:  Raphael [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons

Dr. Andrew Kaethler, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1:10 pm to 2:25 pm

PHIL 333 CP, Philosophy of Literature (3 sem. hrs.)

This course surveys major ancient, medieval, modern, and postmodern approaches that attempt a theory of literature. The course places modern and postmodern theories in historical perspective by reading key ancient and medieval authors.

What is literature? Why is it important, and how does it respond to, and engage with, perennial philosophical questions? One of the important questions we will pursue is the meaningful shaping of human experience through narrative and rational reflection. Both literature and philosophy give form to the apparent chaos of life. To put it differently, both provide story or narrative to the otherwise ceaseless unfolding of events. Moreover, it is not only philosophical reflection that allows for cultural criticism. We will examine how the literary imagination is crucial for seeing things differently. Flannery O’Connor pithily wrote, “In the land of the deaf you have to shout.” Is literature able to shout over the din of our technological culture in a way that philosophy cannot? We will pursue these questions by engaging with the works of writers who bridged the world of philosophy and literature––Flannery O’Connor, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Iris Murdoch, Charles Williams, G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, David Adams Richards, and Plato––along with theorists such as Terry Eagleton, Josef Pieper, Northrop Frye, Richard Kearney, and St Augustine.

   Prerequisite(s): 3 sem. hrs. of philosophy.

   The course meets the University Core Requirement for Philosophy, and meets the requirements for a Philosophy Major, Concentration, or Minor; English Ancillary Requirement; and Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

   All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

   CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image:  “When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things." ― Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass 

Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P., Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:40 am to 1 pm

RELS 101 CP, Introduction to Old Testament Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is an introduction to the major division of the Old Testament (Pentateuch, Prophets, and Writings), including an orientation to the following areas in the field of Old Testament studies: Inspiration, principles of interpretation, canon, text, world of the Old Testament, historical backgrounds, archaeology, theology, criticism, literary forms, and deuterocanonical writings.

  • Prerequisite(s): None

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies, and meets the requirements for the following:
      ° Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Intercultural Religious Studies Minor
      ° Religious Studies Major
      ° Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Image:  A pilgrim's view on the way up Mt. Sinai — in the footsteps of Moses.

Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P., Mondays & Wednesdays, 1:10 pm to 2:25 pm

RELS 102 CP, Introduction to New Testament Studies (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is an introduction to the major writings of the New Testament (Synoptic Gospels, Pauline, and Johannine Writings), including an orientation to the field of New Testament studies in the same areas as listed under RELS 101.

  • Prerequisite(s): none

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies, and meets the requirements for the following:
      º Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Religious Studies Major
      º Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

 

Image:  St. Paul the Evangelist depicted in stone and gripping the instrument of his martyrdom.

Anna Loch, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:40 am to 1 pm

RELS 160 CP, Introduction to Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

An introduction to the field of Systematic Theology. Discusses issues of theological method and the historical development of some major Christian doctrines, and relates them to theological issues today. The CPC section of this course focuses on the articles of faith contained in the Apostle's Creed, and includes a survey of the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

  • Prerequisite(s): None

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - Bible Content (0-5), and meets the requirements for the following:
      º Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      º Religious Studies Major
      º Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

Image:  The Incredulity of Thomas, by Caravaggio.

Image credit: Caravaggio [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

Dr. Brook Herbert, Mondays & Wednesdays,  2:35 pm to 3:50 pm

RELS 224 CP, New Testament Theology (3 sem. hrs.)

This course is a study of the New Testament writings, in their historical settings and chronological sequence, with the goal of acquiring knowledge of their theological unity and diversity. The CPC section of this course focuses on the person and mission of Jesus Christ as articulated in the New Testament documents and subsequently reflected upon in the early credal formulae and in the declarations of the Christian Church Councils of the fourth, fifth, and sixth centuries AD. Students will be exposed to the positions of contemporary scholars on various New Testament-related Christological questions.

  • Prerequisite(s): RELS 102 or instructor's consent

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - Bible Content (0-5), and meets the requirements for the following:
      ° Biblical Studies Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Christianity and Culture Major, Concentration, or Minor
      ° Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC Courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

  

Image:  Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P., Mondays & Wednesdays, 9:25 am to 10:40 am

RELS 399 CP, Catholic Spirituality in the Modern World (3 sem. hrs.)

An analysis of the teachings on prayer and the devout life of Catholic spiritual writers whose teachings still enrich the life of the Church today: especially St. Theresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, St. Bernard of Clairvaux, St. Bonaventure, St. Francis De Sales, St. Therese of Lisieux, and the Venerable John Henry Newman. This course includes an overview of controversial topics such as the rise of “Centering Prayer,” the “New Age” movement, and an analysis of the teachings of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and reflections on the Catholic Tradition of Spirituality from non-Catholic perspectives.

  • Prerequisites: RELS 160, or equivalent with instructor’s permission. (3-0; 0-0)

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

Dr. Andrew Kaethler, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4 pm to 5:15 pm

RELS 465 CP, Influential Thinkers in the Western Christian Tradition (3 sem. hrs)

An Introduction to some seminal figures in the Western Christian tradition. The course investigates their thought and intellectual contributions within their socio-political context and experience. 

  • Prerequisite(s): Rels 101, Rels 102 and third-year standing (3-0)

  • The course meets the University Core Requirement for Religious Studies - C&C/ICRS (6-9), and meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

  • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

  • All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

  • CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.

 

Dr. David Klassen, Wednesdays, 6 pm to 9 pm

RELS 473 CP, The Theology of Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II (3 sem. hrs.)

This course takes an in-depth look at the theological vision of two very influential Catholic theologians of the second Christian millennium: St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope John Paul II. The main features of St. Thomas’s synthesis of Christian thought, especially as found in his great Summa Theologiae, is explored. This is followed by an examination of the “personalist” Thomism of Pope John Paul II, and his program for the renewal of the Catholic Faith, especially as found in selected encyclicals and apostolic letters. The vision and world view of St. Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II are presented as significant and enduring achievements of Christian thought.

St. John Paul II developed a characteristic Personalist Thomism which integrates specific insights from contemporary philosophy (Phenomenology). He also developed theological views through which, drawing inspiration from Aquinas’ insights and the whole Tradition of the Church, he wanted to show the truth and beauty of the faith to men and women of our times. Explore some of John Paul's theological motifs, both theoretical and practical. Among the theoretical, you will discover John Paul’s views concerning Christian humanism and of the Church as communion; among the practical, you will study topics such as the evangelization of culture, technology, and the role of the youth in the world and in the Church. Not without reason, John Paul carried on a number of initiatives in connection with these issues, such as that of World Youth Day.

    Prerequisite(s): RELS 160 or equivalent with permission of instructor. (3-0; 0-0)

   • In order to use this CPC course for any TWU Religious Studies Department degree requiring Christianity & Culture (6-9) courses, please seek permission from the Religious Studies Chair.

   • The course meets the requirements for Christianity and Culture: Catholic Studies Minor.

    All CPC courses may be counted as electives for any TWU Degree.

    CPC courses may count towards CPC certificates as listed in the Course Requirements for each Certificate.