The Immaculate Conception: When? Why? How?
by Dr. David Baird

by Dr. David Baird

February 27 - 7pm

About "The Immaculate Conception: When? Why? How?

Come out for this fascinating public lecture presented by Dr. David Baird, Assistant Professor of Theology at Catholic Pacific College, on the Immaculate Conception of Mary. As the title says, find out the ‘when? why? and how?’ of Catholic doctrine concerning Our Lady’s preservation from sin from the moment of her conception. Don’t forget to bring a friend.

About Dr. David Baird

Dr. Baird's research focuses on theology and culture, with particular interests in Christianity's intersections with story and film. He is currently working on projects related to the early writings of G.K. Chesterton, the theology of Holy Saturday, and the theological significance of postapocalyptic zombie fiction.

 

Image credit: By Giovanni Battista Tiepolo - http://www.museodelprado.es/imagen/alta_resolucion/P00363.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17711733

Image

The Magdalene Ophelia and Repentance in Hamlet
by Rachel Lacy Boersma

by Rachel Lacy Boersma

March 26 - 7pm

About "The Magdalene Ophelia and Repentance in Hamlet"

Ophelia’s madness and death have inspired visual art for centuries. But what makes her image so spectacular and compelling? Considering the post-Reformation environment in which Hamlet was written, this talk suggests resonances between the play’s representation of mad Ophelia and the iconography of St. Mary Magdalene. Ophelia’s unbound hair and bawdy lute call to mind similar characteristics of the penitent disciple as she is depicted in Renaissance art. Mary Magdalene’s renunciation of material comforts and physical beauty was, for many Reformers, a fitting symbol of the Protestant attempt to return to a pared-down aesthetic of worship. In carrying over these distinctive traits of Magdalene iconography, the image of mad Ophelia implicates a broader concern in Hamlet with the material nature of repentance. Through her, Shakespeare holds a mirror up to England after the Reformation, reflecting what it was and what had been lost.

About Rachel Lacy Boersma

Rachel Lacy Boersma is a PhD candidate in English at the University of British Columbia. She has taught English at Corpus Christi College and has published in Shakespeare Bulletin. Her research interests include Shakespearean drama and the English cycle plays, sacramental theology during the Reformation, materialist philosophy, and historical semiotics. Rachel and her family are members of Sts. Joachim and Ann parish, Aldergrove.

 

Image credit: By John William Waterhouse - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:OPHELIA_WATERHOUSE.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=696135

Image
Image